Free Book of Cartoons when you subscribe

Subscribe

Television

Arts | By Roger Lewis | Summer 2017

Moving, soulful, anxious: the late Tim Pigott-Smith in King Charles III

'Moving, soulful, anxious, the portrait of the present Prince of Wales wholly avoided caricature, even if the blank verse of the dialogue toyed with parody' says Roger Lewis

The late Tim Pigott-Smith deserves every plaudit for King Charles III. Moving, soulful, anxious, the portrait of the present Prince of Wales wholly avoided caricature, even if the blank verse of the dialogue toyed with parody: ‘My life has been a lingering for the throne,’ he told us, gazing into the camera lens, like Olivier as Richard III. The idea was that here we had an ‘anointed king’, who saw the monarch’s role as being ‘a check and balance of our land’; who refused to give royal assent to a bill he thought balderdash – something to do with the suppression of press freedom. Charles was presented as the only good man in a world of careerists, sleazeballs and bullies. Everyone shouted at him. His sons were horrible – Harry, ‘a ginger joke bereft of value’, whose idea of fulfilment was pretending to be an estate agent and going to...

Buy a digital version of this issue for £2.99 now