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Exhibitions

Arts | By Huon Mallalileu | August Issue


CANALETTO & THE ART OF VENICE, and PORTRAYING A NATION: GERMANY 1919-33

CANALETTO & THE ART OF VENICE The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, to 12th November Antonio Canal, il Canaletto (1697-1768), has long been Britain’s favourite non-British artist of the 18th century. Venice, his native city, was an essential stop on any Grand Tour from the 1720s until the outbreak of the Seven Years’ War in 1756. Paintings of the Grand Canal were postcards or holiday snaps for the Milordi Inglesi (actually, many of the first Grand Tourists were Anglo-Irish), and there was a thriving industry to supply them.  Canaletto’s nickname meant ‘Little Canal’, or ‘Canal the younger’, in deference to his father, Bernardo. A theatrical scene painter, Bernardo also produced views and had his son trained by the genre’s master, Luca Carlevarijs. The pupil soon outstripped the master, and found the best possible agent in the merchant Joseph Smith, British consul from 1743-60 – a position that brought all Grand Tourists...

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